GenZ: Young, Scrappy and Hungry

I’ve followed the Hamilton Broadway show for about three years, since 2016. To say I love this musical is a drastic understatement. Whenever I listened to Alexander Hamilton’s epic struggles, I felt as if Lin Manuel Miranda himself were manifesting my own thoughts, passions and emotions into song lyrics. Even now, there is one specific lyric that resonates with me.

In the play, Hamilton finds Aaron Burr and He’s trying to gain momentum and make a name for himself by getting an education and fighting in the Revolution (“Aaron Burr”). When the two of them are walking the scene portrays that they are entering into a Pub where they spot Burr’s friends- Lafayette, Hercules Mulligan, and John Laurens. This new scene starts the song that truly introduces Alexander’s goals and ambitions as well as ignites the common passion amongst the brothers of the revolution. It also is where that lyric mentioned previously resides. It’s simple, but powerful. When Alexander is explaining, he tells the group how far he’s come with his moxie and talents through this lyric:

“I’m only 19, but my mind is older.”

Hamilton has a slew of note-worthy quotes, but as a college student trying to gain traction and a name for myself through the people I encounter- I get it.

As seen in my user, logo, title, and all social media I define myself as a member of GenZ.

“Generation Z”

As defined by Urban Dictionary, Gen Z is the group of children born slightly after millennials. Primarily through 1995-2009. This generation has grown up alongside technology of the 21st century, it has known terrorism since early age as well as multiculturalism. Other generations tend to describe this group as…

Technology Obsessed

Angry

Overly Cautious and yet Ignorant at the same time

Along with a few other descriptions, few of them actually being positive. As an older GenZer trying to make her mark on the world, it is extremely difficult to get older individuals who have already made their name known in the world to take you seriously.

This is not to say I don’t have to work at making a name for myself, because I know that it clearly is not the way to go about things. I want to thrive in my job and let my actions speak for themselves but it’s hard to do that when assumptions of older generations make impressions rather than what you’re actually doing.

My Generation has a lot of stigmas attached to its name, and yet we have barely had a chance to make a name for ourselves. We’re young, but we have experienced so much from early on. We have known the pain and suffering that comes from acts of terrorism, so we rally to fight against it. We have experienced financial hardships, so we’ve learned how to be smart with money. We are warriors, the leaders of tomorrow, and yet we’re still being treated like the children of yesterday. It’s ridiculous, especially considering the amount of time and action that comes as a reaction to our work.

When I’m working and when I am trying to present myself to the professionals around me, I want to be judged by my character and work. Not just my age. I am still learning, but the world is my blank canvas and I am ready to paint.

I’m only 19, but like you, Alexander Hamilton, my mind is older.

The Author, formerly frustrated, now renewed

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